The internet is a weird place.  Of late, we’ve had more calls and questions over some of these scientifically sketchy claims of ‘new water technology’ than ever before.

We’re going to go easy on the Penta-Hydrate waters of the world and just let someone else debunk these claims.   At least England isn’t nuts. The British equivalent of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission has issued the following ruling in response to complaints about some of Penta’s claims:

“The Authority concluded that the information submitted was not sufficient to prove Penta water had health benefits over and above those of ordinary water or was structured differently from ordinary water. The Authority told the advertisers not to repeat claims that implied the product was chemically unique, had been restructured or molecularly redesigned, or hydrated cells and improved physical performance better than tap water.”

Kind of a geeky favorite blog for water guys, a retired chemistry professor wrote a pretty solid article on the topic:  http://www.chem1.com/CQ/pentabunk.html

The bottom line with all of this pseudoscience is that it follows the tried-and-true path to selling snake oil.  Grab a few things that are true, so ozonation and ultraviolet purification are legitimate, and then slip in something utterly crazy in the middle, like vibrating water until it possesses magical properties.  Then put a bow and a big price tag on it.  Then take your wagon to the next town and repeat.  I guess the internet just reduces the need to go from village to village by horse.

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